Sabtu, 15 Juni 2013

ScienceDaily: Top News

ScienceDaily: Top News


Medical researchers design variant of main painkiller receptor

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 08:04 PM PDT

Scientists have developed a variant of the mu opioid receptor that has several advantages when it comes to experimentation. This variant can be grown in large quantities in bacteria and is also water-soluble, enabling experiments and applications that had previously been very challenging or impossible.

Stress test and brain scans pinpoint two distinct forms of Gulf War illness

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 08:04 PM PDT

New research suggests that Gulf War illness may have two distinct forms depending on which brain regions have atrophied. In a study of Gulf War veterans, researchers say their findings help explain why clinicians have consistently encountered veterans with different symptoms and complaints.

Medications to prevent clots not reaching some patients

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 08:03 PM PDT

Researchers report that hospitalized patients do not receive more than one in 10 doses of doctor-ordered blood thinners prescribed to prevent potentially lethal or disabling blood clots, a decision they say may be fueled by misguided concern by patients and their caregivers.

Sugar overload can damage heart

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 01:51 PM PDT

Too much sugar can set people down a pathway to heart failure, according to a new study.

Why are there so many youth baseball-throwing injuries?

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 01:51 PM PDT

Surgeons and sports medicine specialists may have some answers as to why youth baseball pitching injuries continue to rise despite the implementation of nationally recommended pitching limits.

Memory-boosting chemical identified in mice: Cell biologists find molecule targets a key biological pathway

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 01:48 PM PDT

Memory improved in mice injected with a small, drug-like molecule discovered by researchers studying how cells respond to biological stress.

New poll finds few Massachusetts residents worried about future terror attacks

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 01:48 PM PDT

Approaching the two-month anniversary of the April 15 Boston Marathon bombing, a new poll shows that only one-in-eight Massachusetts residents are very concerned about a terrorist attack where they live. The poll also indicated distinct party-line divisions regarding which government officials and agencies were to blame for failing to prevent the attack.

Mystery of X-ray light from black holes solved

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 11:05 AM PDT

Astrophysicists using high-powered computer simulartions demonstrate that gas spiraling toward a black hole inevitably results in X-ray emissions.

Bioenergy potential unearthed in leaf-cutter ant communities

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 09:56 AM PDT

As spring warms up Wisconsin, humans aren't the only ones tending their gardens. Colonies of leaf-cutter ants cultivate thriving communities of fungi and bacteria using freshly cut plant material.

Scientists identify neurons that control feeding behavior in Drosophila

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 09:56 AM PDT

Scientists have developed a novel transgenic system which allows them to remotely activate individual brain cells in the model organism Drosophila using ambient temperature. This powerful new tool for identifying and characterizing neural circuitry has lead to the identification of a pair of neurons-– now called Fdg neurons-- in the fruit fly that decide when to eat and initiate the subsequent feeding action.

Secrets of biological soil crusts uncovered

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 09:56 AM PDT

Biologists have performed a molecular level analysis of desert biological soil crusts -- living ground cover formed by microbial communities -- to reveal how long-dormant cyanobacteria become activated by rainfall then resume dormancy when the precipitation stops.

New findings regarding DNA damage checkpoint mechanism in oxidative stress

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 09:56 AM PDT

Researchers have uncovered a previously unknown surveillance mechanism, known as a DNA damage checkpoint, used by cells to monitor oxidatively damaged DNA. DNA repair takes place approximately 10,000 times per cell, per day, through processes that are still only partially understood because of their complexity, speed, and the difficulty of studying complex interactions within living cells.

Study of oceans' past raises worries about their future

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 08:16 AM PDT

Scientists have now completed the first global study of changes that occurred in a crucial component of ocean chemistry, the nitrogen cycle, at the end of the last ice age. The results of their study confirm that oceans are good at balancing the nitrogen cycle on a global scale. But the data also shows that it is a slow process that may take many centuries, or even millennia, raising worries about the effects of the scale and speed of current changes in the ocean.

Scientists explode the myth about running injuries

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 07:08 AM PDT

Ordinary running shoes function perfectly well for new runners regardless of how they pronate, according to new research. Healthy newcomers to running who overpronate/underpronate do not actually suffer more running injuries than other runners if their first pair of running shoes do not have any special support.

Predicting collective online behavior

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 07:07 AM PDT

Scientists are evaluating the impact of a website based on the interaction between its users with the entire Web.

Detecting homemade explosives, not toothpaste

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 07:07 AM PDT

Researchers want airports, border checkpoints and others to detect homemade explosives made with hydrogen peroxide without nabbing people whose toothpaste happens to contain peroxide.

Wild cheetah accelerate fast and reach speeds of up to 58 miles per hour during a hunt

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 05:29 AM PDT

Researchers have captured the first detailed information on the hunting dynamics of the wild cheetah in its natural habitat. Using an innovative GPS and motion sensing collar that they designed, biologists were able to record remarkable speeds of up to 58 miles per hour.

Testing method promising for spinal cord injuries, multiple sclerosis

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 05:28 AM PDT

A medical test previously developed to measure a toxin found in tobacco smokers has been adapted to measure the same toxin in people suffering from spinal cord injuries and multiple sclerosis, offering a potential tool to reduce symptoms.

Metabolic molecule drives growth of aggressive brain cancer

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 05:28 AM PDT

A new study has identified an abnormal metabolic pathway that drives cancer-cell growth in a particular subtype of glioblastoma, the most common and lethal form of brain cancer. The finding could lead to new therapies for a subset of patients with glioblastoma.

Depression in postmenopausal women may increase diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 05:28 AM PDT

Postmenopausal women who use antidepressant medication or suffer from depression might be more likely to have a higher body mass index, larger waist circumference and inflammation -- all associated with increased risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, according to a new study.

Severe maternal complications less common during home births, study suggests

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 05:28 AM PDT

Women with low risk pregnancies who choose to give birth at home have a lower risk of severe complications than women who plan a hospital birth, finds a new study.

Menopause may be an unintended outcome of men's preference for younger mates

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 05:26 AM PDT

After decades of laboring under other theories that never seemed to add up, biologists have concluded that menopause is actually an unintended outcome of natural selection generated by men's historical preference for younger mates.

Can you feel me now? New array measures vibrations across skin, may help engineers design tactile displays

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 05:26 AM PDT

A new array measures vibrations across skin may help engineers design tactile displays.

Geneticists solve mystery of EEC Syndrome's variable severity in children

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 05:26 AM PDT

By identifying a protein that acts as a genetic modifier, scientists have solved the mystery of why some infants are born with a grave syndrome consisting of cleft palate and major deformities of the skin and limbs, while other infants with the same predisposing genetic mutation bear little or no sign of the illness, called EEC.

Using math to kill cancer cells

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 05:26 AM PDT

Scientists have outlined how advanced mathematical modelling can be used in the fight against cancer. The technique predicts how different treatments and genetic modifications might allow cancer-killing, oncolytic viruses to overcome the natural defences that cancer cells use to stave off viral infection.

High prevalence of NSAID prescription in those at risk of heart attack/death in primary care

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 05:26 AM PDT

A new study demonstrates a high prevalence of NSAID prescriptions in patients at risk of ischaemic heart disease.

Nanoparticles helping to recover more oil

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 05:25 AM PDT

When petroleum companies abandon an oil well, more than half the reservoir's oil is usually left behind as too difficult to recover. Now, however, much of the residual oil can be recovered with the help of nanoparticles and a simple law of physics.

From the mouths of babes: Toddlers' speech is far more advanced than previously thought

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 05:25 AM PDT

The sound of small children chattering away as they learn to talk has always been considered cute -- but not particularly sophisticated. However, new research has shown that toddlers' speech is far more advanced than previously understood.

Current affairs make life hard for stickleback dads

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 05:25 AM PDT

This Father's Day, spare a thought for three-spined stickleback fish – who may have been having a tough time this year, according to biologists.

A turbocharger for nerve cells: Key mechanism boosts the signaling function of neurons in brain

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 05:25 AM PDT

Locating a car that's blowing its horn in heavy traffic, channel-hopping between football and a thriller on TV without losing the plot, and not forgetting the start of a sentence by the time we have read to the end -- we consider all of these to be normal everyday functions. They enable us to react to fast-changing circumstances and to carry out even complex activities correctly. For this to work, the neuron circuits in our brain have to be very flexible. Scientists have now discovered an important molecular mechanism that turns neurons into true masters of adaptation.

Flare star WX UMa becomes 15 times brighter in less than 3 minutes

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 05:22 AM PDT

Astrophysicists have detected a star of low luminosity which within a matter of moments gave off a flare so strong that it became almost 15 times brighter. The star in question is the flare star WX UMa.

Smoking in the entrances to bars increases the presence of nicotine inside

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 05:22 AM PDT

The protection provided by the smoking ban decreases when people can still smoke outside the venue. For the first time, a study has analyzed the effects of the modification to the Spanish tobacco control law, implemented in 2011 in hospitality venues in Spain. The findings show that smoking on terraces and in the entrances to bars and restaurants increases the concentration of nicotine and particulate matter, which affects clients and hospitality professionals alike.

Developmental protein plays role in spread of cancer

Posted: 14 Jun 2013 05:17 AM PDT

A protein used by embryo cells during early development, and recently found in many different types of cancer, apparently serves as a switch regulating the spread of cancer, known as metastasis, report researchers.

Could novel drug target autism and fetal alcohol disorder?

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 01:18 PM PDT

A surprising new study reveals a common molecular vulnerability in autism and fetal alcohol disorder. Both have social impairment symptoms and originate during brain development. The study found male offspring of rat mothers given alcohol during pregnancy have social impairment and altered levels of autism-related genes found in humans. But the damage was reversed with a thyroid hormone given to the mothers during pregnancy.

Chronic drinking and exposure to particulate matter dramatically decreases lung function

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 01:18 PM PDT

Alveolar macrophage (AM) function plays a critical role in protecting the lungs by removing particulates. Chronic drinking causes persistent oxidative stress in the lungs, leading to impaired AM function. A new rodent study shows that chronic drinking appears to intensify lung damage caused by particulate matter.

Finasteride, medication for male pattern hair loss, may also decrease drinking

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 01:18 PM PDT

Finasteride is a synthetic drug for the treatment of male pattern hair loss and an enlarged prostate. Rodent research has shown that finasteride can reduce alcohol intake. A preliminary study of men with finasteride-related sexual side effects indicates that finasteride may decrease drinking.

Tobacco laws for youth may reduce adult smoking

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 01:17 PM PDT

States that want to reduce rates of adult smoking may consider implementing stringent tobacco restrictions on teens. Scientists discovered that states with more restrictive limits on teens purchasing tobacco also have lower adult smoking rates, especially among women.
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Jumat, 14 Juni 2013

ScienceDaily: Top News

ScienceDaily: Top News


Major hurdle cleared to diabetes transplants

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 01:18 PM PDT

Researchers have identified a way to trigger reproduction in the laboratory of clusters of human cells that make insulin, potentially removing a significant obstacle to transplanting the cells as a treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes.

Universal paid sick leave reduces spread of flu

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 01:18 PM PDT

Allowing all employees access to paid sick days would reduce influenza infections in the workplace by nearly 6 percent, according to a first-of-its-kind analysis. The researchers simulated an influenza epidemic in Pittsburgh and surrounding Allegheny County and estimated it to be more effective for small, compared to large, workplaces.

Unzipped nanotubes unlock potential for batteries

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 12:33 PM PDT

Graphene nanoribbons and tin oxide make an effective anode for lithium ion batteries, as discovered in early tests.

Autonomous energy-scavenging micro devices will test water quality, monitor bridges, more

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 12:33 PM PDT

Researchers are using photonics in their quest to "bring the lab to the sample," developing sophisticated micro instruments that scavenge power from sunlight, body heat, or other sources, for uses such as monitoring water quality or assessing bridge safety.

Odors from human skin cells can be used to identify melanoma

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 12:33 PM PDT

Researchers identified odorants from human skin cells that can be used to identify melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. In addition a nanotechnology-based sensor could reliably differentiate melanoma cells from normal skin cells. Non-invasive odor analysis may be a valuable technique in the detection and early diagnosis of human melanoma.

Nanoparticle opens the door to clean-energy alternatives

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 11:28 AM PDT

Cheaper clean-energy technologies could be made possible thanks to a new discovery. An important chemical reaction that generates hydrogen from water is effectively triggered -- or catalyzed -- by a nanoparticle composed of nickel and phosphorus, two inexpensive elements that are abundant on Earth.

Context crucial when it comes to mutations in genetic evolution

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 11:28 AM PDT

Evolutionary biologists have found that whether a given mutation is good or bad is often determined by other mutations associated with it. In other words, genetic evolution is context-dependent.

Warm ocean drives most Antarctic ice shelf loss

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 11:28 AM PDT

Ocean waters melting the undersides of Antarctic ice shelves, not icebergs calving into the sea, are responsible for most of the continent's ice loss, a new study has found.

Putting flesh on the bones of ancient fish: Synchrotron X-rays reconstruct soft tissue on 380-million-year-old fish

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 11:28 AM PDT

Scientists present for the first time miraculously preserved musculature of 380 million year old armored fish discovered in north-west Australia. This research will help scientists to better understand how neck and abdominal muscles evolved during the transition from jawless to jawed vertebrates.

Satellite data will be essential to future of groundwater, flood and drought management

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 11:28 AM PDT

New satellite imagery reveals that several areas across the US are all but certain to suffer water-related catastrophes, including extreme flooding, drought and groundwater depletion. A new report underscores the urgent need to address these current and rapidly emerging water issues at the national scale in the U.S.

How diving mammals evolved underwater endurance

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 11:28 AM PDT

Scientists have shed new light on how diving mammals, such as the sperm whale, have evolved to survive for long periods underwater without breathing.

Medieval leprosy genomes shed light on disease's history

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 11:26 AM PDT

Scientists have reconstructed a dozen medieval and modern leprosy genomes -- suggesting a European origin for the North American leprosy strains found in armadillos and humans, and a common ancestor of all leprosy bacteria within the last 4000 years.

Gustatory tug-of-war key to whether salty foods taste good

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 11:26 AM PDT

As anyone who's ever mixed up the sugar and salt while baking knows, too much of a good thing can be inedible. What hasn't been clear, though, is how our tongues and brains can tell when the saltiness of our food has crossed the line from yummy to yucky -- or, worse, something dangerous. Now researchers report that in fruit flies, at least, that process is controlled by competing input from two different types of taste-sensing cells: one that attracts flies to salty foods, and one that repels them.

Dangerous strains of E. coli may linger longer in water than benign counterparts, study finds

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 10:36 AM PDT

A toxin dangerous to humans may help E. coli fend off aquatic predators, enabling strains of E. coli that produce the toxin to survive longer in lake water than benign counterparts, a new study finds. The research may help explain why water quality tests don't always accurately capture health risks for swimmers.

Black locust tree shows promise for biomass potential

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 10:36 AM PDT

Researchers evaluating the biomass potential of woody crops, are taking a closer look at the black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia), which showed a higher yield and a faster harvest time than other woody plant species that they evaluated, said a crop scientist.

Evidence for extrasolar planet under construction

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 10:35 AM PDT

The keen vision of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has detected a mysterious gap in a vast protoplanetary disk of gas and dust swirling around the nearby star TW Hydrae, located 176 light-years away in the constellation Hydra (the Sea Serpent). The gap's presence is best explained as due to the effects of a growing, unseen planet that is gravitationally sweeping up material and carving out a lane in the disk, like a snow plow.

Genetics of dyslexia and language impairment unraveled

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 09:43 AM PDT

A new study of the genetic origins of dyslexia and other learning disabilities could allow for earlier diagnoses and more successful interventions, according to researchers. Many students now are not diagnosed until high school, at which point treatments are less effective.

Oysters could rebound more quickly with limited fishing and improved habitat

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 09:43 AM PDT

A new study shows that combining improved oyster restoration methods with limits on fishing in the upper Chesapeake could bring the oyster population back to the Bay in a much shorter period of time. The study assessed a range of management and restoration options to see which ones would have the most likelihood of success.

Programming blood forming stem cells

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 09:43 AM PDT

By transferring four genes into mouse fibroblast cells, researchers have produced cells that resemble hematopoietic stem cells, which produce millions of new blood cells in the human body every day. These findings provide a platform for future development of patient-specific stem/progenitor cells, and more differentiated blood products, for cell-replacement therapy.

Culprit implicated in neurodegenerative diseases also critical for normal cells

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 09:43 AM PDT

The propensity of proteins to stick together in large clumps -- termed "protein aggregation" -- is the culprit behind a variety of conditions including Huntington's and Alzheimer's. With this notoriety, protein aggregation is considered to be a bad accident of nature. But new research shows that, when kept in balance, protein aggregation has beneficial functions that allow cells to organize themselves. The findings will be valuable as researchers design treatments for diseases that involve this process.

New fluorescent protein from eel improves key clinical assay

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 09:42 AM PDT

Unagi, the sea-going Japanese freshwater eel, harbors a fluorescent protein that could serve as the basis for a new clinical test for bilirubin, a critical indicator of human liver function, hemolysis, and jaundice, according to researchers. The discovery also sheds light on the mysterious and endangered Unagi that could contribute to its conservation.

Protein protects against breast cancer recurrence in animal model

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 09:42 AM PDT

Precisely what causes breast cancer recurrence has been poorly understood. But now a piece of the puzzle has fallen into place: Researchers have identified a key molecular player in recurrent breast cancer – a finding that suggests potential new therapeutic strategies.

A peptide to protect brain function

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 08:22 AM PDT

Medical researchers have developed a new peptide, called NAP or Davunetide, that has the capacity to both protect and restore critical cell functions in the brain. Her findings indicate that NAP could be an effective tool in combating effects of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, ALS, and Parkinson's.

Greater convenience and safety for wheelchair users

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 08:20 AM PDT

With modern communication aids, users of electric powered wheelchairs can operate a PC and cellphone without human assistance. A new module is set to transform electric powered wheelchairs into communication hubs.

Study points to role of nervous system in arthritis

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 08:19 AM PDT

Reducing levels of nerve-growth factor may be a key to developing better pain treatments.

World population could be nearly 11 billion by 2100

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 08:19 AM PDT

A new United Nations analysis shows the world population could reach nearly 11 billion by the end of the century, about 800 million more people than the previous projection issued in 2011.

DNA brings materials to life: DNA-coated colloids help create novel self-assembling materials

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 07:44 AM PDT

A colloid is a substance spread out evenly inside another substance. Everyday examples include milk, styrofoam, hair sprays, paints, shaving foam, gels and even dust, mud and fog. One of the most interesting properties of colloids is their ability to self-assemble -- to aggregate spontaneously into well-defined structures, driven by nothing but local interactions between the colloid's particles. Self-assembly has been of major interest in industry, since controlling it would open up a whole host of new technologies, such as smart drug-delivery patches or novel paints that change with light. Scientists have now discovered a technique to control and direct the self-assembly of two different colloids.

New molecular-level understanding of the brain's recovery after stroke

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 07:44 AM PDT

A specific MicroRNA, a short set of RNA (ribonuclease) sequences, naturally packaged into minute (50 nanometers) lipid containers called exosomes, are released by stem cells after a stroke and contribute to better neurological recovery according to a new animal study. The research provides fundamental new insight into how stem cells affect injured tissue and also offers hope for developing novel treatments for stroke and neurological diseases, the leading cause of long-term disability in adult humans.

After an ACL tear: Research opens door to new treatments to improve recovery for athletes

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 07:44 AM PDT

Striking the likes of Chicago Bulls' Derrick Rose, L.A. Lakers' Kobe Bryant and Detroit Tigers' Victor Martinez, tears in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are one of the most rampant and serious knee injuries among athletes. Now, researchers have identified a new drug target that may prevent one of the most dreaded consequences of an ACL tear -- the weakening or loss of muscle tissue (muscle atrophy) that can be a career-killer in sports and ultimately develop into osteoarthritis.

Light-carved 'nano-volcanoes' hold promise for drug delivery

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 07:44 AM PDT

Researchers have developed a method for creating "nano-volcanoes" by shining various colors of light through a nanoscale "crystal ball" made of a synthetic polymer. These nano-volcanoes can store precise amounts of other materials and hold promise for new drug-delivery technologies.

Helping to restore balance after inner ear disorder

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 07:41 AM PDT

A new study makes the first attempts to design and test a vestibular prosthesis to help restore balance for those with Meniere's disease. Many disorders of the inner hear which affect both hearing and balance can be hugely debilitating and are currently largely incurable. Cochlear implants have been used for many years to replace lost hearing resulting from inner ear damage. However, to date, there has not been an analogous treatment for balance disorders resulting from inner ear disease.

Repairing turbines with the help of robots

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 07:41 AM PDT

Compressor and turbine blades are important components in aircraft engines and gas turbines. When they become damaged, it is often cheaper to repair them than to buy replacements. Now there is a new robotassisted technique that is boosting efficiency.

Brain-imaging technique can help diagnose movement disorders

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 07:41 AM PDT

A new study suggests a promising brain-imaging technique has the potential to improve diagnoses for the millions of people with movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease.

Gene offers an athlete's heart without the exercise

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 07:41 AM PDT

Researchers have found that a single gene poses a double threat to disease: Not only does it inhibit the growth and spread of breast tumors, but it also makes hearts healthier.

Gene variants may predict who will benefit from breast cancer prevention drugs

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 07:41 AM PDT

In women at high risk for breast cancer, a long-term drug treatment can cut the risk of developing the disease in half. Researchers have identified two gene variants that may predict which women are most likely to benefit from this therapy.

Helmet crash tests: Don't hit the road without one

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 06:24 AM PDT

A new laboratory study shows bicycle helmets significantly reduce the causes of head, skull and brain injury -- linear and angular head accelerations, and the impact force of a crash. The biomechanical research with crash test dummies found that crashing without a helmet exposes the head to loads up to 9.5 times greater than with a helmet.

'Tailing' spiny lobster larvae to protect them

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 06:23 AM PDT

In a new study of spiny lobsters scientists studied the larval dispersal of this species in the Caribbean. The goal of the study was to describe the sources, sinks, and routes connecting the Caribbean spiny lobster metapopulation. The results led the team to propose marine resource management strategies that incorporate larval connectivity and "larval lobster credits" to sustain and rebuild exploited marine populations.

'Self-cleaning' pollution-control technology could do more harm than good, study suggests

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 06:23 AM PDT

Environmental scientists shows that air-pollution-removal technology used in "self-cleaning" paints and building surfaces may actually cause more problems than they solve. The study finds that titanium dioxide coatings, seen as promising for their role in breaking down airborne pollutants on contact, are likely in real-world conditions to convert abundant ammonia to nitrogen oxide, the key precursor of harmful ozone pollution.

Volunteering reduces risk of hypertension in older adults

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 06:23 AM PDT

It turns out that helping others can also help you protect yourself from high blood pressure. New shows that older adults who volunteer for at least 200 hours per year decrease their risk of hypertension, or high blood pressure, by 40 percent. The study suggests that volunteer work may be an effective non-pharmaceutical option to help prevent the condition. Hypertension affects an estimated 65 million Americans and is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease.

Austerity cuts to Spanish healthcare system are 'putting lives at risk', experts say

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 06:23 AM PDT

A series of austerity reforms made by the Spanish government could lead to the effective dismantling of large parts of the country's healthcare system, with potentially detrimental effects on the health of the Spanish people, according to new research.

Stacking up a clearer picture of the universe

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 06:23 AM PDT

Researchers have proven a new technique that will provide a clearer picture of the Universe's history and be used with the next generation of radio telescopes such as the Square Kilometer Array.

50 percent of rheumatoid arthritis patients discontinue medication within the first two years

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 06:23 AM PDT

Up to one-third of rheumatoid arthritis patients discontinue or change therapy within the first year of treatment.

Prefab houses that are glued, not nailed, together

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 06:22 AM PDT

With prefabricated houses, the dream of having one's own home can quickly become a reality. Until now, nails have been used to hold the individual components together. Now an adhesive tape has been developed to perform this task.

Spot-welding graphene nanoribbons atom by atom

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 06:22 AM PDT

Scientists have created single atom contacts between gold and graphene nanoribbons.

New catalyst neutralizes gases responsible for climate change

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 06:22 AM PDT

New technology prevents nitrous oxide decomposing it into nontoxic products. The catalytic system is active, efficient and stable over time and can purify gases emitted by industries related to the production of fertilizers, plastics and coal burning plants to produce electricity or vehicles.

First evidence of a new phase in neutron stars

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 06:22 AM PDT

The nuclear 'pasta', called as such due its similarity to the Italian food, limits the period of rotation of pulsars, and astronomers have detected the first evidence of existence of a new phase of matter in the inner crust of neutron stars.

Smart technology makes its way into lighting

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 06:22 AM PDT

The lighting systems of the future could be multi-purpose devices not dissimilar to smart phones. In the future, lighting will not just allow us to see but could also be used to survey surroundings, transmit information, reflect moods and make our lives more comfortable. Smart lighting could also save as much as 80 per cent of energy compared to traditional lighting solutions.

Lighter meals for fish in the northern Baltic Sea

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 06:22 AM PDT

The nutrition available for fish in the northern Baltic Sea has become lighter during the past 30 years.

Cutting post-surgical infection rate

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 06:20 AM PDT

Medical researchers are recommending clinical guidelines that will cut the post-surgical infection rate for staph bacteria (including MRSA) by 71 percent and 59 percent for a broader class of infectious agents known as gram-positive bacteria.

Deep brain stimulation trial in treatment-resistant obesity links weight loss trend to metabolism increase programmed in metabolic chamber

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 06:20 AM PDT

A deep brain stimulation trial in treatment-resistant obesity linked a weight loss trend to a metabolism increase programmed in a metabolic chamber, according to a pilot study.

Free bus travel for teens curbs road traffic injuries and benefits environment

Posted: 12 Jun 2013 07:42 PM PDT

Free bus travel for teens helps curb road traffic injuries and benefits the environment, reveal the results of an analysis of the free bus scheme in London.

Every 10 tobacco ad sightings boost teens' risk of starting to smoke by almost 40 percent

Posted: 12 Jun 2013 07:42 PM PDT

Tobacco ads really do persuade teens to take up smoking, with every 10 sightings boosting the risk by almost 40 percent, reveals new research.

Doubling of deaths among sick moms-to-be amid poor evidence on drug safety in pregnancy

Posted: 12 Jun 2013 07:42 PM PDT

The lack of hard data on the safety and effectiveness of a wide range of drugs in pregnancy has hindered the treatment of pregnant women, contributing to a doubling of deaths amongst mums-to-be with an underlying health problem over the past 20 years, argues a new editorial.
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